Where Strength and Size are the only goals

Posts tagged “Shoulder Pain

Thursday 28th November 2013

SPIN

After last Bench session, shoulder has inflamed again! tendonitis in left shoulder. Pretty sure it’s due to the fact I’m only training twice a week at present so putting too much emphasis on the main lifts and not enough on the additional work. 

I’m going to take the rest of December to rehab the shoulders and strengthen posterior chain (still working on those deadlifts!) so a big focus on back/rotator cuff/scapular control and whilst I’m at it, some glute/hamstring strengthening as well.


DC training and 5/3/1 – A change of plans

Well after two full cycles,  my shoulders have taken a battering already and rotator cuff is sore as hell (probably from the chest/shoulder/tricep combo every other session). It is also moving away from my goal, which is strength based. Although I’m a stickler for not changing your program unnecessarily, if it hurts, stop doing it!

Is it worth continuing through the pain (and probably making it worse!) when I’m not feeling fully comitted? Nope! As I’ve stressed before, a program is as effective as your commitment to it. If you are not motivated by it, you won’t put in the effort, nor reap the benefits. I have enjoyed the rest-pause training and the variation of lifts, but there are definite things that aren’t for me! I think this program is better suited for ‘enhanced lifters’ if you know what I mean!

I have decided to change to Wendlers 5/3/1 with the rest-pause training as detailed in his second edition of 5/3/1. This way I can still progress with my strength training on my main lifts and continue with the rest-pause training.

Wendler looking ‘Hench’

 

 

 

 

 

I will be doing the following:

Press 5 – RP last set

Deadlift 5s, then 65% max reps

Pull-ups warm-up set, RP set

Straight curls 50% x5, 60% RP

SLDL 50% x5, 60% RP

B1

Bench 5 – RP last set

Squat 5, then 65% max reps

CG Bench 50%x5, 60% RP

‘T’ Rows 6-9, 9-12

RG bar curls 50%x5, 60% RP

A2

Press 3 – RP last set

Deadlift 3s, then 70% max

Chin-ups

Straight curls 50%x5, 70% RP

SLDL 50%x5, 70% max

B2

Bench 3 – RP

Squat 3, then 70% max

CG Bench 50% x5, 70% max

Lever Row 50%, 70% RP

RG Bar Curls 50×5, 70 max

A3

Press 5/3/1 as normal, then 75% RP

Deadlift 5/3/1, then 75% max

Chins (palms facing)

Straight curls 65%x5, 80% max

SLDL 65%x5, 80% max

B3

Bench 5/3/1 as normal, then 75% RP

Squat 5/3/1, then 75% max

CG Bench 65%x5, 80% max

Cable Row 6-9, 9-12

RG Bar Curls 65%x5, 80% max

I’ll also be doing pass-throughs every day to help shoulder mobility and still working on loosening up my hip flexors!

 


The Decline Bench Press – Build a bigger chest without shoulder pain

Anyone who has been doing bench press in some variation will have had or still suffer from shoulder pain. Usually around the anterior deltoid (front shoulder) or impingement in the rotator cuff area. Though you would think otherwise the flat bench press tends to irritate the shoulder more than the overhead press. This is because the flat bench utilises the anterior deltoid heavily, especially with a medium to narrow grip, developing mainly the front part of the shoulder. Whereas the overhead press (performed correctly) develops the shoulder as a whole.

Most bodybuilders believe that the chest should be worked at all angles and that decline is for the lower chest only. In fact during EMG studies it has been shown that the decline bench press (at a minimal angle i.e 15-20 degrees) actually activates more total chest muscle than other angles. Not only that, but there is a lot less pressure on the anterior deltoid seriously reducing chance of injury and less irritation for already damaged shoulders. Many of the biggest names (and bodies!) in bodybuilding – Yates, Coleman & Cutler to name a few, swear by the decline bench and use it as a main stay of their training, this should make it definitely worth considering if mass is your goal.

One of the things I particularly like about the decline bench is that it feels so much better, the angle feels more natural (it resembles the movement the pectoral muscles are mainly responsible for) and certainly for me, I am more aware of my chest in the movement and so find it easier to focus on the lift rather than the pain in my shoulders!! You can also move more weight in a decline position, increasing your strength and confidence under the bar, which can then help you past sticking points when you return to flat benching.

If you haven’t tried it before (or even if you have), replace your flat bench with it for a while. When you reach a plateau swap it back out again and see how it has helped your strength come along, as well as your physique! Just be sure to have a spotter to hand as any bench, and worse case, dare I say it? use a smith machine for safety.